How much should you pay for pet insurance?

Pet insurance costs are affected by multiple factors.

Manuel De Los Reyes Rubio/EyeE


No one likes to pay more than they need to. And with inflation remaining persistent, even if it has cooled off, many Americans already know that they’re paying more for goods and services than they were in the recent past.

No matter what you’re buying, however, it helps to do your research. This is particularly true for financial products and services, which can sometimes be difficult to navigate. And while most people are familiar with the basics, there’s a gray area when it comes to other products, pet insurance being one of them.

Pet insurance provides owners with a financial safety net should their dog or cat experience any illnesses or medical emergencies. In exchange for a monthly premium to a provider, owners can rest comfortably knowing that they have guaranteed medical care – and that it won’t break the bank. The benefits of such a service are multiple and significant. 

But how much should you pay for pet insurance? That’s the question we will dive into below. If you want to get a specific price quote for your furry friend, however, just insert some basic information here now.

How much should you pay for pet insurance?

There is no singular answer to this question. Instead, the cost will be based on a series of factors. Take these into account when trying to determine if you’re paying the right amount (or if you’re paying too much).

Age

Younger pets are almost always cheaper to insure than others. That’s because they pose less of a fifinancial risk to the insurer, which will be reflected in your monthly premium. So if you’re paying $50 a month for a 5-year-old dog, expect to pay less for a puppy or a 1-year-old (with all other factors being even). Check prices with pet insurer Lemonade here now.

Breed

Some breeds of cats and dogs have more medical issues than others. That doesn’t mean you won’t be able to insure them. In most cases, you will be able to. Just understand that you’re typically going to pay more for a Newfoundland dog, known for its hip dysplasia issues, than you would for a Goldendoodle. And even though cats are generally cheaper to insure than dogs, they also have a wide range of prices based on breed and type.

Location

It may not seem fair for a location to play a part in pet insurance costs but it does. Medical care for humans is often more expensive in some ZIP codes and areas of the country than it is for others. The same concept applies to pet insurance. So if you live in New York or Miami, for example, you may pay more than you would if you lived in a less expensive part of the country.

Not sure what you’d have to pay? Get a free pet insurance quote in 30 seconds here now.

Coverage

What do you really need pet insurance for? This is an important question to ask yourself because it will inform the type of policy you get and, thus, what you pay. In short: if you want (or need) more robust pet insurance protections then you should expect to pay more than if you just secured an accident-only policy for broken bones and swallowed items.

The bottom line

Personal financial considerations are just that – personal. So how much one person “should” pay for pet insurance is relative. By taking the above factors into consideration, however, you can be better informed and prepared. This will help you build both a cost-effective and valuable plan for your beloved pet.

Get a free pet insurance quote here now and learn more!

Leave a Comment